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Sailing forward with your business with Steve Morris - Season 2, Episode 7

Updated: Jul 26

3 top tips from Steve Morris


1. Self regulation and self control

So as leaders and managers, we are helping all of our people metabolize their stress, like everybody's bringing their problems to us as a leader. So, we have to help everybody work through their stress, but all of that ends up on our shoulders as a leader. So, we have to be able to deal with that, right, we have to be able to be calm in the middle of chaos, to be able to do these things, to be able to simplify to delegate to be able to predict all of the skills that we teach our clients. And, so as part of that, you know, no one ever taught me this, this concept earlier on in my career.


There's things that you can do to be able to manage your stress. And part of the is to sort of have some knowledge about what goes on inside you, in terms of things that trigger you. To be aware of these sorts of things.


What I work on with some of my clients is to be aware of when you're getting triggered, then there's things that you can do. And one of those things is to engage with the breath. Because our breath is the remote control for our nervous system and our physiology and our psychology are not separate. So, all of these things are all bound up together there.


So, I'm just starting off, the first thing is, just engage with your breath, and when things are getting chaotic. Just feel your breath and start getting back in touch with where you are.


2. Surround yourself with getting the right people

The things that we do work on with our clients and EOS, which is really around people, right? I mean, being able to surround yourself with getting the right people. I think that that's so incredibly important, because it really is.


You can't achieve great things without having great people. So, really start looking at who you're bringing onto the team and your relationships with them and building that trust, getting everybody on board with heading in the right direction.


3. Get a process in place

I'm a systems guy, so let's get a process in place. Let's get a system in place to be able to solve this. And, I really believe that and sometimes, though some of the issues that we're dealing with, people call 'soft issues' (which are not soft issues at all!).


They're the hard things to deal with. How do you have a conversation with somebody? You know, a difficult conversation with somebody, how do you hold people accountable? How do you work with your team around things like stress and burnout? These are not easy things. But we do actually have processes and systems that we can put in place to be able to have conversations to be able to really get on the same page with everybody in our organization about where we're going and how we're going to get there.







SUMMARY KEYWORDS

business, people, clients, team, eos, boat, boats, sailing, vision, simplify, core values, yachting, design, component, new zealand, world, processes, grant, career, established

SPEAKERS

Steve Morris, Debra Chantry-Taylor

Debra Chantry-Taylor 00:12

Welcome to another episode of Better Business, Better Life. I'm your host, Debra Chantry-Taylor. I'm passionate about helping entrepreneurs and their leadership teams get what they want out of business and life. On the show, I invite successful business owners and expert speakers to share their successes. They are open and honest about the highs and lows of business and also life as a business owner. We want to share those learnings with you to inspire you, but also to help you avoid some of the common mistakes. My hope is that you take something from each of these short episodes that you can put into action to help you get what you want. Not only out of your business, but also your life. So Good morning, and welcome to another episode of Better Business, Better Life. Today, I have got Steve Morris with me who is a professional EOS implementer, based now in Baltimore, but originally from New Zealand. Is that right, Steve?

Steve Morris 01:02

Yes. Good morning, Debra. How you doing?

Debra Chantry-Taylor 01:04

I'm very well, thank you. Hey, look, I'm really excited to hear from you. Because I know that you're a passionate sailor. And obviously here in New Zealand, we're very, we're very fond of our sailing as are the Americans. So tell me a little about your story, please Steve

Steve Morris 01:16

Well sure, so you can see behind me on the wall up here, there's this white boat, and that's Fisher and Paykel New Zealand. So my first job out of college was working for Grant Dalton on Fisher and Paykel back in 1988/1989. It's a while ago now. But that's how I got started with my whole career. And that's been a really interesting journey. But I can still remember back, kind of coming out of engineering school thinking I was going to be a designer. And then instead, my first job responsibility was getting up in the morning at six o'clock and going to the gym and seeing how much you know iron weight, we can lift up the floor training with the crew and things like that.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 01:56

Okay. And so, Grant is a bit of a well known man over here, what was it like working with him?

02:05

So grants are really cool and interesting guy. I mean, I still now you know, follow the news. And I haven't talked to him for a while, but keeping in touch with what he's been doing, and the news and just, you know, seeing this person who has this incredible tenacity and perseverance, right to to keep on pushing forward. And that's who he was, you know, back when I was was working for him. And you know, he was the skipper on Fisher and Paykel just this drive right, to be able to keep continually pushing the team forward. Having that vision for where we needed to get to go, and then, you know, really pulling a team together around that and everything that we needed to do to be able to be successful on that boat. So it was a wonderful start to my career to be able to work for somebody like that and to be able to see, you know, really, what incredible leadership really was.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 02:59

Fantastic. So what would you say is the one thing that stands out for you in terms of that leadership that you've taken forward into? Because you've run your own businesses as well? And you've obviously worked with other people? What have you taken out of that experience into your own business world?

Steve Morris 03:12

Well, you know, that's what I saw in Grant is, you know, that tenacity, and that perseverance and that ability just to keep on going despite obstacles, and despite all the other things that are that are coming in. And I I think there's something about that perseverance that I've kept close to myself as well. And you know, as you know, running a business is not, you know, easy at all, right, there's always things happening every single day. And particularly in EOS, we talk about, you know, these 136 things, coming at business owners every single day, and then just having that perseverance, to be able to keep moving forward to solve those issues, to be able to keep the company moving forward. Something that I've really seen, I've taken that to heart and use in my own business.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 04:07

So tell me a bit about your own business.

Steve Morris 04:10

Well, so I've, I've had quite an interesting career. Over the last... since I worked for Grant, I actually ended up coming here to the United States and working for Bruce farr and Russell Bowler at Farr Yacht Design for many years, designing America's Cup Boats and other, you know, Volvo Ocean Race Boats. At one stage, Grant was... several times I guess, along through there, Grant was one of our clients, as well, a lot of other, you know, really incredible, driven people in business. And this model here is article racing. So Larry Ellison, the CEO of Oracle was one of our clients for many years. So just to be able to work with people like that, to have them as our clients and to be in a position where we were kind of, you know, really responding to that, they set an incredibly high bar, right, they wanted to win, because they're already successful in business. And then they wanted to bring that success into the sailing world and to compete and to win. So I really learned a lot about leadership about bringing together a systems and processes all of the things that we talk about in EOS, and bring together teams to be able to be able to help our clients be successful. And then after that, I also spent 10 years becoming a certified project manager and helping the US Navy, here in Washington, DC, which is near where I am here in Maryland. And then I started my own business six years ago re around this mission and this passion to help people, teams and businesses get unstuck, and sail forward, as I like to say.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 05:57

Nice analogy. I love it. Okay, and so you, you're now and as a professional EOS implementer, what brought you on that journey?

Steve Morris 06:07

So I was doing a lot of leadership team development work with my clients in my business, and really sort of seeing like, I was able to get them sort of so far down the track of becoming more healthy and successful, as a team. But then I was sort of re sort of searching for something a little bit deeper, and with a little bit more structure around it. And I was introduced to traction and EOS. And, I immediately fell in love, because here last I sort of had found these tools that I wished I'd had, you know, back when I was in the yacht design days and pulling together teams running your design business, but also to have a framework that had been used, it's you know, it's a complete proven system of a simple set of practical tools that have been used in 10,000 businesses, right. So it's, there's a lot of knowledge, there's a lot of the testing on the trialing of that has been done. And now we have a set of tools that we know that when we apply them in the framework that we have, and work with our clients, and we go on the journey that we go on with our clients, then we will get to success. And I just love that.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 07:22

Yeah, I also love the fact that it is based on, you know, amazing brains around the world and bringing all this kind of knowledge together into something that's very simple, because I think that as entrepreneurs, we tend to... if things are a little bit too broad, we can get carried away with that. So by really simplifying it down, I think makes a massive difference. Okay, so you know, you talked about how sailing, and building boats and things is very similar to running a business. Tell me more about how you think EOS relates to yachting to business, just give us give me more of your story, I'd really be keen to hear a bit more about that.

Steve Morris 08:02

Right. So I mean, in EOS, we talk about these six components, that we are working with our business clients to strengthen these six components in the business and the first one is vision, right, and getting everybody in the leadership team on the same page with where you're going and how you're going to get there. And when we're working in these sailing teams, you know, there's some interesting aspects of that, because the vision, like, where are we going? Well, that's a very defined thing. You know, we're going to win the America's Cup, we're going to win the Around the World yacht race, the Volvo race. Those sorts of things. But even still, you know, underneath that vision, that's really getting everybody on the same page about how we were going to do that, that oftentimes, you know, could be more challenging. And these components that we work on with our clients around establishing core values, right, like, who are we, as a team. So incredibly important, and as I look back over my career, and as I look back with the really successful teams that we work with, and other teams that, you know, had resources, but weren't so successful, I really sort of see that those successful teams were built around this idea of establishing core values and figuring out like, you know, who we really are as a team, and then being very deliberate and intentional about how those were used, you know, as the team was put together.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 09:34

Absolutely. Hey, have you ever seen sort of challenges around getting people on that same page?

Steve Morris 09:40

Well, yes. And that's, you know, that's, I think the second component that we talk about when we're working with our clients is people. The people component, right. So of course vthe crew on these boats and bringing the whole team together, not just the crew, but all support people. The master designers that was so critical. And you know, when we work with our EOS clients, we talk about two components there. Right people, right seats, okay? And so right people are people who share our organization's core values, and right seats are people who are really great at their job. And when I look at that, you know, I sort of see well, when we had these really successful teams, and perhaps, you know, when we had great resources, like the temptation is to just go and you know, hire and contract, the best people that you can find like the most expensive, the top sailors, let's just get them all right, top shelf, the whole way. But then you get everybody in a room like that, and that's when it's sort of like... it starts getting a little bit, hmm... Why are these people here? What are their motivations? And if we hadn't had that conversation and that intentionality around core values, then it didn't work, right to sort of getting all of the very best people and putting them in the room doesn't mean that they're going to work together. And one of the best campaigns that I saw, remember, that I worked with was actually the Illbruck Around the World campaign. This is way back in 2001/2002. The skipper, John Kostecki, he was an American, he had Ross Halcrow, who was a kiwi and one of my crew mates on Fisher and Paykel. They were so intentional about how they built that team. And it really was around this idea of core values. And who are we as a team? And each new person coming onto the team? Did they fit? Did they fit on the team? Did they fit the culture like a glove? You know, Are they really coming in and bonding on the team. And then when I'd go sailing with them, it was it was a very different environment than I had experience, oftentimes. And of course, they went and dominated the addition of Volvo Around the World yacht race and won. So the proofs in the, in the result,

Debra Chantry-Taylor 12:19

In the pudding. Absolutely. Cool. Okay, so beyond... so obviously, yes, having a strong vision, understanding why you exist, having the same sort of core... that getting some real clear core values and makes you've got those right people in the right seats, doing the right thing is really important. What's next?

Steve Morris 12:35

Well, so the third component that we work on with our clients is data. Right. And so this is, you know, when the business context, we talk about making decisions on facts and figures and objective information, it's no different on the boat. And, you know, it's sort of, I think, it's really interesting, as I sort of look back from when I sort of got started with working for Grant, he hired me to be the Performance Analyst on the boat, to have the computers and to be trying to figure out how we were doing and getting the boat to sail faster. So that data, that having that objective data at the time, of course, it was incredibly important to be able to figure out, you know, how we were going to do in the round the world yacht race, and then, as I look to now, right, the latest version/edition of the America's Cup, and, you know, these boats have sensors, from the top of the masks to the bottom of the foils from the bow to the stern, new we have companies like Airbus involved, you know, that the entire thing, like the sensors onboard the boat are generating gigabytes and gigabytes of data every time they go out sailing. And so compared to where we were 30 years ago, it's just like, it's a whole whole new world. But that data, you know, I feel like, there's something about the performance there. I mean, we've gone from boats that were sailing, you know, at 10 knots up when two boats that are sailing up, 40/45 knots up when Raven, we've gone up, you know, 400% increase in speed. And part of that has come from data. And I like to sort of, you know, talk about that increase in performance. And I'd like to bring that back to that sort of business sense of, look what happens when you can reduce all of the drag that's on your business, right, all of the things that are getting in the way and, the rework, and the do overs and the inefficiencies and all of the stuff that's dragging away on the business. When we've done that and sailing boats now, we're going four times faster. That's amazing. When you love to do that in your business too?

Debra Chantry-Taylor 15:05

Absolutely, and it's about measuring the right things isn't it's not measuring the ego stuff, but measuring the things that really make a difference.

Steve Morris 15:11

Yeah.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 15:12

Okay, so we've got the vision, we've got the right people, we're measuring the right things, what comes next?

Steve Morris 15:17

Well, so then the fourth component we talked about, of course, is the issues component, because when we get the vision, when we get the people, we have the data, you know, now we start having transparency, and where we're seeing the obstacles, the imperfections. And, you know, as we work with our clients, we're working with our clients to really help them figure out how to solve issues together as a team. And, you know, when you look at the recent America's cup, what stands out in my mind is American magic, right, the US challenger that fateful giant, they had around the top mark there got hit by a gust, boat's up in the air, and then suddenly slammed down on its side and gets a hole in it. Now the boat's starting to sink, what a challenge, what an issue, right? But now the team's got to come around and work together to be able to save the boat. And of course, then to also see all of the other challenges coming in and team New Zealand as well to be able to help save this boat and get them ready to sail again, and they get the boat back to the dock right, on the heart and inside the shed. And now everybody has to come together to patch the boat and to repair us and to be able to get it ready to sail again. And this is really where, you know, if you've put the training, and if you've done the team building, if you've built the trust, all of those things now allow the team to be able to come together to solve issues together to solve them quickly and to have them go away. Instead of having them you know, some you don't have that trust, if you don't have that team building, then things can have the potential to devolve, right, you can get into the finger pointing and the blame and, you know, complaining...

Debra Chantry-Taylor 17:15

And also not dealing with the real issues, right? Because I mean, we've seen this with a business or work with sometimes the issue that is presented is not necessarily the real issue. And so having the healthy team is prepared to go a bit deeper and sort of actually really solve those issues at the root cause.

Steve Morris 17:32

Yeah, and I see this with my, my clients often too, it's just sort of like this thing of having meetings and trying to make decisions, but not really being able to be efficient about making decisions having the same things just be repeating over and over and over. You've got to be able to solve those things. And I've seen it with the teams that I've worked with the ones that have the ability to do that. Yeah, off they go.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 17:59

Great. So again, we've got vision, we've got the right people, we're measuring the right things, we're solving our issues at the root cause and putting them to bed once and for all, what comes next.

Steve Morris 18:09

So the fifth component we work on is process, right. And this is about re documenting the things that we do and making sure they're done the right way, and the best way every time. And I really feel you know, at that Farr Yacht Design, this was one of I think it's sort of like it was our secret sauce. We had a lot of secret sauces, but this was a really good one. Because we were really good at being able to figure out our design processes and document them. So that we were able to them, use them right to be able to get that consistency. And so, we were able to design boat after boat, after boat that was able to win, win, win, and because we took everything that we learned and we put it into documenting our processes. And we talked about this, you know, and we work with this with our clients in EOS, you can when you document your processes, then they're done the right way. And that's just a huge relief to a business owner, right? So many clients and business owners that I talked to, they're worried, they're stuck in the business, and that they will, you know, this... are things going to be done the right way, or people are always kind of bringing them, you know, should I do this? Should I do that? All of that goes away when you document your processes and get the consistency. And then once you have consistency then we can scale. And, we were able to do that in a design sense as well. Like having the processes documented now allowed us to be able to do more work. I think was also I mean... we had a lot of responsibility as designers, designing boats that are out in the middle of the Southern Ocean. 1000s of miles away from land. You mean, no one's coming to help, right if something goes wrong. So to be consistent, and to make sure that we were designing those boats the right way, you know, was incredibly important. And that was a very essential part of what we were doing as designers.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 20:19

Yep. Okay. So one of the things I often find when we start talking about sort of documenting processes that can be a bit overwhelming for people at first, because if you think about all the things that are involved, it does feel like it's a huge amount of work. What would you say to that?

Steve Morris 20:36

Well, so that's the taking the approach of simplification. And part of the EOS model is to simplify and to use what we call the 80/20 approach, right, document 20% of the steps that get you 80% of the way there. And when I look at the way we used to do it, and the yacht design, we would have design sheets, a sheet of paper, start at the top, work your way down, and you get the answer at the bottom. And, that really, you know... just step by step by step, but not to make it overly complicated, but just to be able to simplify. And to get that answer that's really close enough to be able to see that, you know what you're supposed to be doing how you're supposed to be getting the process done?

Debra Chantry-Taylor 21:25

Sure. Okay. Great. So we've gone through all of these things. And we're now sort of at the sixth component, what's the sixth component?

Steve Morris 21:31

Traction right?

Debra Chantry-Taylor 21:33

Traction! Yeah.

Steve Morris 21:35

Yes. And I really see that, you know, when I look back at my career, I just sort of I think about those times, when we'd had great vision, working with clients that had great vision, and then really about that the separator, around success, which has been able to bring the vision down to the ground and to get traction, right. And so what does that really mean, that really talks about, you know, being able to, like, get everybody on the same page, but then having established your vision, like, what are you actually going to be doing, say for the next year? You know, if you've got a longer campaign, and then establishing that, and then what are you going to do for the next 90 days to really be able to focus on your priorities? And then what are you doing coming together as a team to be able to meet to be able to solve issues to be able to exchange information on a weekly cadence? And seeing... you know, for those successful teams that we've worked with, really had that ability to be able to come together to make sure that we were meeting to be our exchange information to get, you know, the right stuff worked on within the team, on a good cadence to be able to be able to get traction on achieving our vision. Yeah, so when I sort of... the work that I'm doing with with EOS, now I can look back over my career and see those points where the successful teams, we're applying some of those principles, if not all of them at various stages in their campaigns.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 23:28

Sure, that makes perfect sense. So tell me so in terms of... when I talk to people about EOS, it often feels very, very simple. And they said, it's that simple, you know, it can't possibly work. How would you respond to that?

Steve Morris 23:42

Well, there is a simplicity to it. But it's a framework, right. And, you know, as an engineer, and a project manager, I mean, I'm a systems guy, and this is what I've done my entire career, this is how, you know, we can design boats that go sailing around the world, this is how we can design boats that fly above the surface of the water by taking something that is complex, and simplifying it, right, but it doesn't mean that it becomes something that my four year old could do or something like that in crayon, right? It just means that we've been able to, to take something that's that's complex, and to be able to separate it down and put it into a framework and to be able to work through a system to be able to achieve success. And so...

Debra Chantry-Taylor 24:37

it's about that focus isn't it brings focus and it also brings that whole less is more if everything's important, nothing's important that by focusing on what's important, we actually get the results.

Steve Morris 24:46

Yeah, yeah.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 24:47

Yeah. Okay, so tell me just in terms of your career, both in EOS and and in your business and then what's been some of your biggest professional best and personal best in that time do you think?

Steve Morris 25:01

Oh my gosh, hmm... So I really think, you know, looking back at some of the campaigns that I worked on, back in the art design days, things like the Illbruck around the world campaign was... Yeah, I've got a lot of sort of special memories about being involved with that team and things that we're able to achieve. Also, Oracle racing, I mean, that was another big time in my career, being having a lot of responsibility about how we are pulling that design together and the things that we were doing with them. I really look back on those, you know, what sort of like a lot of sense of achievement about how we were able to move the capabilities forward in terms of what we're able to design, what we're able to achieve working together with teams. On a sort of more personal level. More recently, in my business, I've been working with all sorts of teams and educating people and teaching people and being involved actually, also with a lot of kids, helping them learn engineering skills. And there's a couple of girls in engineering school here in the US that wouldn't have been an engineering school if they hadn't been involved in some of the programs that I'd been running. And that's something I'm kind of happy about and proud of, because we need more women engineers in this world.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 26:37

Oh, absolutely. So for our listeners, we like to always give them some practical tips that they can take away. So I really appreciate you sharing, you know, your yachting analogy, I think it's absolutely fantastic. What are the three key things you would recommend people should look at doing to improve their business to get a better life?

Steve Morris 26:56

Yeah, so the number one thing I start working on with my clients is actually self regulation and self control.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 27:06

What do you mean by that?

Steve Morris 27:09

Well, so it's an interesting thing, right. So as leaders and managers, we are helping all of our people metabolize their stress, like everybody's bringing their problems to us as a leader. So, we have to help everybody working through their stress, but all of that ends up on our shoulders as a leader. So, we have to be able to deal with that, right, we have to be able to be calm in the middle of chaos, to be able to do these things, to be able to simplify to delegate to be able to predict all of the skills that we teach our clients. And, so as part of that, you know, no one ever taught me this, this concept, you know, earlier on in my career, but there's things that you can do to be able to manage your stress. And part of the is to sort of have some knowledge about what goes on inside you, in terms of things that trigger you. To be aware of these sorts of things. And then to also, what I work on with some of my clients is to be aware of when you're getting triggered, then there's things that you can do. And one of those things is to engage with the breath. Because our breath is the remote control for our nervous system and our physiology and our psychology are not separate. So, all of these things are all bound up together there. So, I'm just starting off, the first thing is, just engage with your breath, and when things are getting chaotic. Just feel your breath and start getting back in touch with where you are. So that's, you know, it's not part of the EOS curriculum.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 28:48

No, no, but it's it's certainly, you know, it's part of being a better person, which leads to being yeah...

Steve Morris 28:56

yeah. Better leader. I mean, it's sort of like, what's that phrasing? I'm not going to get it right. But it's sort of like if everyone around you losing their heads, and you know, you can't remember the rest of it now, but

Debra Chantry-Taylor 29:09

I know you're talking about I can't I there's I can't help you out, I'm afraid. Okay, so that's the first one. So self regulation, and then self control. So number two?

Steve Morris 29:18

well so the number two is, you know, the things that we do work on with our clients and EOS, which is really around people, right? I mean, being able to surround yourself with getting the right people. I think that that's so incredibly important, because it really, you can't achieve great things without having great people. Right. So I think that that's sort of like the second thing is to really start looking at who you're bringing onto the team and your relationships with them and building that trust, getting everybody on board with heading in the right direction. So that's number two.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 29:53

And the last one?

Steve Morris 29:54

the last one? well, I'm a systems guy, so let's get a process in place. Right. You know, this is the project manager and the engineer in me, is when we've got a problem.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 30:06

Bring a system or process in here,

Steve Morris 30:08

yes, let's put a process in place, let's get a system in place to be able to solve this. And I really believe that and sometimes, though, you know, some of the issues that we're dealing with what people call soft issues, right? Which are not soft issues at all. You know, they're the hard things to deal with. How do you have a conversation with somebody? You know, a difficult conversation with somebody, how do you hold people accountable? How do you work with your team around things like stress and burnout? These are not easy things. But we do actually have processes and systems that we can put in place to be able to have conversations to be able to really get on the same page with everybody in our organization about where we're going and how we're going to get there.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 30:59

Okay, brilliant. And I think you know, you're talking about system on a process. I mean, in reality, EOS is an operating system, it's part of that... bringing that system into your business was what I think we both love about EOS, so yeah. Okay, great. So we're just we're running out of time, I just want to say thank you so much for joining me this morning. I don't know what time it is over there at the moment, I'm assuming it's later in the afternoon is it?

Steve Morris 31:20

It's quarter to six in the evening here.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 31:22

Evening. Okay. Well, look, I appreciate you giving us your time. If people want to get in contact with you. So your business is called Catylator. What's the best way for them to get in contact with you, Steve?

Steve Morris 31:31

Probably through email, steve@catylator.com. Also my website, of course, catylator.com. And I'm on LinkedIn @StephenMorris.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 31:43

Fantastic. Hey, look, thank you so much for your time. I really, really love the yachting analogies. I think it's fantastic. So thank you for sharing that. I look forward to seeing you again soon.

Steve Morris 31:50

Yeah. Well, thanks, Debra. It's been a great conversation. And I certainly hope that some of the yarding stories can help down in New Zealand spread the word, spread the idea that you know, EOS really has this complete proven system and I love working with my clients on it. I love the feelings of relief. And that is exhilaration. We've got a plan in place. We're going to get there. That's awesome.

Debra Chantry-Taylor 32:15

That's fantastic. Thank you very much. Thanks again for joining us some better business better life with me Your host Debra Chantry-Taylor. If you enjoyed what you heard, then please subscribe to this podcast. And let us help you to get what you want out of business in life. Each week we release a new short episode which will give us success story and three takeouts to put into action immediately. These will help you take your business from good to great. The podcast is also supported by free resources, templates and useful tools, which you can find at Debra Chantry-Taylor dot com. I am a trained entrepreneur leadership and business coach, a professional EOS implementer and an established business owner myself. I work with established businesses to help them get what they want. Feel free to contact me if you'd like to have a chat about how I might be to help you. Or if you'd like to join me as a guest on this podcast. Thanks again to entered audio editors for producing this podcast. See you on the next episode.


Debra Chantry-Taylor


Professional EOS Implementer | Entrepreneurial Leadership & Business Coach | Business Owner

#betterbusinessbetterlife #entrepreneur #leadership

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